Home > Literature, Politics > Cicero still teaching us today

Cicero still teaching us today

Cicero was an ancient Roman Consul. He served in the Roman government for many years. John Adams said that “all the ages of the world have not produced a greater statesman and philosopher united than Cicero“. In his works The Republic and The Laws, Cicero explains his thoughts on good government and leadership.

Two of my favorite points he makes are:
1. People should learn to do of their own accord what they are compelled to do by the law.
2. There is no other occupation in which human virtue approaches more closely the function of the gods than that of founding new States or preserving those already in existence.

In his time, many of his wealthy friends wondered why he would waste his time in politics. His answer is that good, brave, and high-minded men get involved in order to not be ruled by wicked men, and not to allow the republic to be destroyed by them.

There are so many people in our time that want to focus solely on making money and living “the good life.” For the most part, I have no complaints about this. But we also need to make sure and preserve the government that protects the freedoms and liberties we enjoy, not just try to get away with whatever we can and leave it to future generations to pick up the pieces.

When I read “good, brave and high-minded men get involved in order to not be ruled by wicked men”, it made me think of my brother Greg. He’s a guy like most of America: he has a family, a job, hobbies and interests, etc. But he also gets involved in protecting our republican form of government.

When the US Representative that represents Greg wasn’t voting the way most of the people in their district wanted based on their polls, he and his friends got involved. They made phone calls. They set-up websites and blogs. They called on their Rep for explanations of her votes. Their efforts were noticed by national media outlets and brought enough pressure on their Congressional Representative that she was finally forced to respond.

I asked him about the purpose of his involvement. Was he planning on running for office? Other political aspirations? His answer was that he just couldn’t sit by and let the elected officials keep doing whatever they wanted, and not be held accountable. He just couldn’t sit by and let it happen.

Shades of Cicero, perhaps?

Is this Cicero ... or my brother Greg?

Is this Cicero ... or my brother Greg?

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  1. May 21, 2010 at 3:00 pm

    What I think is so essential about Cicero is that he KNEW. He knew what he was talking about. People can’t get that kind of education without serious effort. It usually doesn’t come from a university. He was a scholar and we have never been in deeper need of scholars with public virtue like Cicero than we do now. There is something fundamentally different between activists who are enthusiastic but don’t have a liberal education or broad historical knowledge and statesmen like Cicero who can act as a ballast for a nation. We need more Ciceros. You are lucky to have such a brother :).

  2. May 23, 2010 at 5:33 am

    Nice post…Thank you for sharing some good things!!

  3. May 29, 2010 at 5:49 pm

    If only I had a dollar for every time I came here… Amazing read.

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  1. May 16, 2010 at 4:32 am

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